Get Off My Mound wins out for 2010

12/30/2010 5:04 AM - Devo

Get Off My Mound.JPGAll in all 2010 was a great season, historic you could say! 

Pitchers were once again in control.   The average runs per game for each team in 2010 was nearly a run lower than in 2000 (5.39 compared to 4.44), and an enhanced drug policy enforcing a more regulated testing system has shown the fans that game can be played clean.  

The playoff chases were in full bloom with the return of the Atlanta Braves taking it down to the wire against the San Diego Padres and the eventual World Series champion San Francisco Giants. 

I couldn’t possibly leave Roy Halladay off the list.  He has proven again that he is arguably the best pitcher in this era. A perfect game in the regular season and a no-hitter in the playoffs are truly remarkable.  Can you just imagine the damage he would have caused if he played in the National League his whole career instead of battling the American League East for the past 13 years?   

Armando Galarraga’s perfect game that wasn’t will live in infamy forever, but the way both parties handled situation should be equally commended. 

After 22 seasons “the Kid” went gently into retirement.  Known for the smile and the backwards cap, Ken Griffey Jr. played with reckless abandon and never met a wall he didn’t like.  A natural in the field, and a poet at the plate, Junior will go down as one of the best the game has ever seen. 

Sports is part of our everyday life, social media is in full-force and without a doubt discussing baseball leads to more arguments than not. 

Even if both parties are right, neither side will admit it, as is the case between Dallas Braden and his misunderstanding (lol) with Alex Rodriguez. 

Considering all of the above, I have to select the “Get off my mound” episode as my highlight of 2010. 

 It’s not too often when a non-steroidal episode can make late night television.  Sometimes we really do take the game too seriously and need an incident like this to take the edge off.   

A-Rod violates an unwritten rule, and regardless of what was said, walking over the pitcher’s mound is a no-no. A-Rod knowing that has done many questionable acts in his day.  The “hey” or “I got it” debacle in Toronto was one, and swiping the ball from Bronson Arroyo’s glove was another. 

And whether it’s good or bad, he drums up publicity for the game.  Any publicity is good publicity right? 

Rodriguez can get under anyone’s skin, and he knows it.  Except this time he picked on the wrong guy.   

Regardless if Braden has peaked with his no-hitter is one thing, the underdog shoving it in the face of Goliath is the underdog story we all love. 

Braden tosses a perfect game on Mother’s day with his grandmother in the stands, his grandmother gives possibly the quote of the year with “Stick it, A-Rod”, and the next thing you know, Braden is reading a top ten list on David Letterman. 

You cannot right a script that good. 

In all likelihood Braden will drift away into obscurity, and A-Rod will take his place as the game’s homerun king, yet for one day Braden v. Rodriguez was the biggest thing going. 

 Devon Teeple is an author for the Business of Sports Network, which includes the Biz of Baseball, the Biz of  Football, the Biz of Basketball and the Biz of Hockey.   Devon is also a contributor to the Canadian Baseball Network

Devon is a
Demand Media Studios writer, featured writer on Examiner.com and is now a member of the Yarbarker Network.

He is a former professional baseball player with the
River City Rascals & Gateway Grizzlies.

Devon is a former student within
Sports Management Worldwide’s Baseball General Manager Class. Devon is the founder of The GM’s Perspective and is an intern with The Football Outsiders and contributor with the Plymouth River Eels.

 Currently, Devon is a Branch Manager at a financial institution in Southern Ontario Canada.  He can be reached at devon@thegmsperspective.com , thegmsperspective@yahoo.com ordevon@businessofsportsnetwork.com

**Devon is member of The Professional Writers Association of Canada**
**Devon is available for hire or freelance opportunities**

Bud Selig and MLB playoff expansion is a perfect match

12/26/2010 7:33 PM - Devo

2010 MLB World Series.jpgRecently I was on Mike Silva’s NY Baseball Digest radio show.  First, I would like to thank Mike Silva to allow me the opportunity to participate on his show.   

For those of you who would like to listen to the show click here (I am on around the 40 min. mark). 

We discussed realignment, which is a fascinating idea, but one that I believe will lose out to another adjustment; playoff expansion. 

Expansion will drive more revenue to the game and keep the fans enthralled for an extended period. 

Realignment is entertaining when you think about it; then again an extended playoff system seems more justifiable at this point.  Extending the playoffs with a wild card team worked before, and it will work again. 

There are a few scenarios to this new situation; 

  • Will the team with the best record earn a bye to the next round
  • Will the two wild card teams battle each other in a best-of-three, best-of-five, or perhaps a one-game sudden death playoff 

All those aside, why even think about bringing in an extra team.  Is baseball on a collision course with watering down the regular season they way the NBA and NHL have with over half of the teams eligible to make the playoffs (16 of 30)? 

In my opinion; not even close.

According to the Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, playoff teams generate $17.7 million in additional revenue.

“The Angels reported $12.1 million in revenue from hosting five first- and second-round playoff games in 2009 and nearly $4.4 million for hosting two first-round games in 2008, according to the reports published by Deadspin.com.

“The Rays made almost $17.7 million in revenue on the six postseason games they hosted in 2008. Having two home games in the World Series helped boost those results”

And for the small market or second-tier teams like the Oakland Athletics and Baltimore Orioles, $2.2 million per home game sounds pretty decent.

From the fans perspective there is nothing more entertaining/dramatic than a good ole’ fashion pennant race to end the season.  And being a Braves fan myself, every game was life or death during the last two weeks of the 2010 season.   

Commissioner Bud Selig recently talked expansion with NBC Sports and NY Daily News meaning the wheels are most certainly in motion.  Unfortunately, it looks like the expansion will not happen for at least two seasons.  As you know, there are always a few obstacles.

“Selig would not rule out expanded playoffs as soon as next season, and the new format could include two new wild-card teams. Wild-card teams in each league could play an opening round, either one game or best-of-three”

“But any changes would be subject to collective bargaining, and Rob Manfred, MLB's executive VP for labor relations, said Tuesday that putting any changes in so soon would be too difficult. So any playoff expansion is more likely for 2012, if at all.”

Two wild cards teams suggest that franchises that usually pack it in by the all-star break do not necessarily become sellers; they can keep their stars.  On the other hand they do not necessarily become buyers unless it is absolutely essential.

Teams like the Kansas City Royals, Pittsburgh Pirates, Baltimore Orioles and Toronto Blue Jays to name a few, are stuck in the same cycle of selling off their players or regrettably seeing themselves out of the playoff picture, not mathematically, but realistically by July every single season.

The addition of the second wild card does give these clubs some extra hope where it never existed before.  Some teams, like I mentioned, can keep their home grown talent instead of trading them for some future prospects that continue to keep said team three to four years away from competing.

Building a roster and building a solid fan base that will continue to see their hometown team compete with home grown talent is what we are all hoping for.  At the same time, clinching a playoff berth leads to additional advertisement revenue.  Additionally an increase and retention of season ticket purchases and the reputation as a legitimate contender.

This new playoff system will succeed.  It will allow the growth and popularity of the sport to blossom.

Not all change is bad in a sport that we all know for its familiarity.

Devon Teeple is an author for the Business of Sports Network, which includes the Biz of Baseball, the Biz of  Football, the Biz of Basketball and the Biz of Hockey.   Devon is also a contributor to the Canadian Baseball Network

Devon is a
Demand Media Studios writer, featured writer on Examiner.com and is now a member of the Yarbarker Network.

He is a former professional baseball player with the
River City Rascals & Gateway Grizzlies.

Devon is a former student within
Sports Management Worldwide’s Baseball General Manager Class. Devon is the founder of The GM’s Perspective and is an intern with The Football Outsiders and contributor with the Plymouth River Eels.

 Currently, Devon is a Branch Manager at a financial institution in Southern Ontario Canada.  He can be reached at devon@thegmsperspective.com , thegmsperspective@yahoo.com ordevon@businessofsportsnetwork.com

**Devon is member of The Professional Writers Association of Canada**
**Devon is available for hire or freelance opportunities**

Toronto Blue Jays have their sights set on the playoffs

12/20/2010 10:31 PM - Devo

Toronto Blue Jays 2011.jpgThe 2011 Toronto Blue Jays already have a different feel to them. 

The Jays are in an unfamiliar position when the 2011 season begins:  Playoff hopefuls. 

How many times can a Jays fan say that since 1993?  Not many.  This year’s club is focused more on manufacturing runs instead of relying on the long ball.   

Does that work in the power laden American League East? It worked for the Tampa Bay Rays. 

The difference between this years and last; A level playing field.  Sort of. 

While you may scoff at that comment, realistically the AL East will be won by the Boston Red Sox.  I am very confident when I say that.  Their recent acquisitions of Adrian Gonzalez, Carl Crawford, Bobby Jenks and Dan Wheeler are a definite eye-opener. 

Aside from the superstar signings, the Wheeler transaction could pay off huge in those late innings games.  Wheeler does not make headlines and is not the flashiest guy coming out of the pen, but you can count on him for 70 plus appearances, approximately 65 innings a year and a WHIP around 1.00.   

The Jays, despite trading Shaun Marcum, still have a legitimate rotation led by Ricky Romero, Brett Cecil, Brandon Morrow.  This also includes possible back-end rotation guys like Jesse Litsch, Marc Rzepczynski, Scott Richmond, David Purcey, and probably the mostly likely candidate as their number four starter, Kyle Drabek. 

Drabek, the Eastern League pitcher of the year, was dominant in his 27 starts for the New Hampshire Fisher Cats.  Drabek went 14-9 with a 2.94 ERA in 162 innings, and compiled 132 strikeouts while giving up 68 base on balls.  By the way, include a no-hitter into that mix! 

That rotation can compete with the Red Sox and definitely with the Yankees who appear to be in rough shape after losing out on the Cliff Lee sweepstakes.   

If the Bronx Bombers cannot convince Andy Pettitte to return their rotation of CC Sabathia, Phil Hughes, and A.J. Burnett, they will not and cannot compete.  Heck, Sabathia can’t pitch 50 games. 

With pitching taken care of, that leaves the Jay bats. 

If 2010 homerun leader Jose Bautista can sustain some remnants of his 50 home run season, that is a bona fide bonus.  The x-factor lies with two of the Jays most talented and most criticized players from this past season.   

Aaron Hill, and Adam Lind, will all but have to rebound from disastrous campaigns and become the hitters everyone expected when the both lit up the scoreboard to the likes of 30 homeruns and 100 plus RBI in 2009. 

If Travis Snider and Vernon Wells put up any numbers close to what is expected, they will surely leave the Yankees in the rear-view, leaving three teams to challenge them for the AL Wild Card. 

In my estimation, the Wild Card battle sits between four teams; Minnesota Twins, Chicago White Sox, Detroit Tigers, and our feathered friends from the north. 

The Minnesota Twins are again against the eight-ball after losing a huge part of the bullpen in Jesse Crain.  And success depends on the recovery of Justin Morneau and Joe Nathan. 

While we all love the Twins and the underdog story, the American League Central will most likely come down to the Detroit Tigers and Chicago White Sox. 

The Sox have retooled and added Adam Dunn to their line-up and Jake Peavy seems to be on the rebound. 

The Tigers decided to play the free agent game this off-season and have done quite well.  They now have a devastating 1-2 punch in Jose Valverde and Joaquin Benoit, and the recent addition of Victor Martinez adds some additional experience to a very young line-up. 

Chemistry is the deciding factor when it comes to determining this year's lottery winner. 

Every interview, every advertisement, every commercial stresses the team factor.   

In a sport where we can get caught up in personal achievements the 2011 Toronto Blue Jays have apparently found a formula that includes more team and less me.  Couple that with a focus on small ball and fundamentals, gives this team a serious edge against some fierce and improving competition.
 

Devon Teeple is an author for the Business of Sports Network, which includes the Biz of Baseball, the Biz of  Football, the Biz of Basketball and the Biz of Hockey.   Devon is also a contributor to the Canadian Baseball Network

Devon is a
Demand Media Studios writer, featured writer on Examiner.com and is now a member of the Yarbarker Network.

He is a former professional baseball player with the
River City Rascals & Gateway Grizzlies.

Devon is a former student within
Sports Management Worldwide’s Baseball General Manager Class. Devon is the founder of The GM’s Perspective and is an intern with The Football Outsiders and contributor with the Plymouth River Eels.

 Currently, Devon is a Branch Manager at a financial institution in Southern Ontario Canada.  He can be reached at devon@thegmsperspective.com , thegmsperspective@yahoo.com ordevon@businessofsportsnetwork.com

**Devon is member of The Professional Writers Association of Canada**
**Devon is available for hire or freelance opportunities**

 

 

A picture is worth a thousand words

12/18/2010 7:03 PM - Devo

scott-brosius-goes-deep.jpgIs there any sport where a still frame can bring back the memories of one game, one year, or even a specific time in your life? 

There is not one point that I can remember where I can say the game has not played some role in one way or another.   

From inspiring me as a kid to attempt to become a big leaguer, to the motivation outside of the game to become something more than a former athlete, I owe the game more than I can repay it. 

I do not have fifty years of baseball experience to look back on…I am in my early 30’s, but the Scott Brosius home in the 2001 World Series was perhaps the second craziest sports moment I have ever seen.   

The first had to be the Tino Martinez homerun the game before.  I specifically remember watching Byung-Hyun Kim dominate the New York Yankee hitters, striking out four of the first six batters he faced. 

Unfortunately for Kim, Martinez hit one of the most awe inspiring homeruns I have ever seen.  I yelled so loud that I woke up my dad, a lifelong Yankee fan, who was still recovering from working a two-week stint on the midnight shift. 

What made Brosius’ homerun even more remarkable than the Martinez blast from Game 4, was that that poor kid from Arizona came out on the losing end of arguably two of the most exciting homeruns that the game has ever produced. 

There is not a sport today where an image can spark such a reaction. 

Sure, the NFL has “the catch”, hockey has “the miracle on ice”, and the NBA has Craig Ehlo getting burned by Michael Jordan. 

Using Ehlo as an example, odds are he would come out on the losing end every time! 

Surely Kim couldn’t blow it two nights in a row.

He was as dominant of a reliever the game had.  He held opponents to a .173 batting average while “the atrocious one” was a career .257 hitter. 

“It borders on the surreal, here in the Bronx”, was the call after the game tying shot. 

If the Yankees celebration was more than you could handle, what does this reaction say? 

Kim Homerun.jpg

Baseball is so much of our everyday lives that these images are worth more than what they appear. 

It is what we watch all weekend long, what we talk about at family functions, what parents teach their kids.  It sparks countless hours of debate on who is the best clutch hitter, best pitcher and best player of all-time. 

In this case, one pitch created two pictures that literally defined the careers of two athletes.  One retired a champion the other, never again the same.

Devon Teeple is an author for the Business of Sports Network, which includes the Biz of Baseball, the Biz of  Football, the Biz of Basketball and the Biz of Hockey.   Devon is also a contributor to the Canadian Baseball Network

Devon is a
Demand Media Studios writer, featured writer on Examiner.com and is now a member of the Yarbarker Network.

He is a former professional baseball player with the
River City Rascals & Gateway Grizzlies.

Devon is a former student within
Sports Management Worldwide’s Baseball General Manager Class. Devon is the founder of The GM’s Perspective and is an intern with The Football Outsiders and contributor with the Plymouth River Eels.

 Currently, Devon is a Branch Manager at a financial institution in Southern Ontario Canada.  He can be reached at devon@thegmsperspective.com , thegmsperspective@yahoo.com ordevon@businessofsportsnetwork.com

**Devon is member of The Professional Writers Association of Canada**
**Devon is available for hire or freelance opportunities**

 

Browse by Month »

July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010

Arizona Winter League
Jury Jiu Jitsu
Myles Jury
OMG Cleaning Services